Date: 28th February 2016 at 10:31am
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Billed as having the potential to be a classic fight, the super-bantamweight world title unification fight between Carl Frampton and Scott Quigg was far from that.

In fact, with the build-up it was afforded it could quite easily be described as a stinker.

Whereas we thought both fighters would be stood toe-to-toe, neither boxer was prepared to risk getting caught with Quigg, in the first six rounds, offering very little in the way of offensive attacking work

By the time Quigg woke up, after Joe Gallagher, in his corner, told him he was 6-1 down after seven rounds, Frampton almost had the fight in the bag, nicking the early rounds with a crisp jab that occasionally connected although never really troubled the fighter from Bury.

With the IBF super-bantamweight and WBA titles at stake, you?d have thought the action would have been more entertaining.

Perhaps it did a little in the 8th and 9th rounds but it still wasn?t the kind of fight that the audience screaming for me.

In fact the fight?s brightest round was the 10th when Quigg kind of realised he was going to lose the fight his world title belt and his unbeaten record if he didn?t stop Frampton.

But any punches Quigg unleashed, might have stopped Frampton in his tracks but the durable Irishman knew, by know, he had Quigg?s number.

The11th round saw Quigg pushing forward again but Frampton, knowing Quigg had to stop him to win, coped well enough.

Coming out for the last round Quigg knew it was all or nothing but Frampton knew the fight was in the bag and an Ali-shuffle showed the huge crowd he knew he was going to be going back to Ireland with both the belts and his unbeaten record intact.

When the final bell sounded, both boxers lifted their arms in the air believing they were the victors as we awaited the judge?s verdicts.

As it turned out, it was a split decision with Frampton getting the verdict 116-112 on the cards of two judges whilst the third, strangely, gave the fight to Quigg by 115-113.